Tag Archives: NYC

Man Pleads Guilty to Poaching Deer on Staten Island


NBC New York, March 23rd, 2015

FULL TEXT:

A Staten Island man has pleaded guilty to illegally killing a deer in what may be New York City’s first-ever poaching case.

David G. Oakes was ordered to pay $3,000 in fines after entering guilty pleas to several charges including illegal taking of a deer without a license and trespassing.

Oakes was arrested by state environmental conservation officers at Schmul Playground, in the Travis-Chelsea neighborhood on the west side of the island, on Nov. 11.

He declined comment to NBC 4 New York on Friday.

The Staten Island Advance reports that the man was nabbed after officers caught him dressed in camouflage, carrying a bow. He allegedly set up cans and bait piles to lure the deer into his sights, and had no hunting license.

The man hadn’t actually killed a deer when he was arrested, the Advance reports, but told police he had taken down an eight-point buck in the same spot a year before.

Oakes’ conviction comes as the city’s least populous borough sees an explosion in poaching instances, the Advance reports. The paper reports that at least one poacher killed a deer with a shotgun, but most illegal hunters have used crossbows and composite bows.

Hunting is illegal on Staten Island and in New York City’s other four boroughs. Westchester and Suffolk counties permit deer hunting, but only with a bow.

Deer populations have risen exponentially on Staten Island in recent years.

Advertisements

West Nile Virus Detected In NYC Mosquitoes


Yeshiva World, July 15th, 2014

FULL TEXT:

For the first time this season, the Health Department has detected West Nile virus in New York City mosquitoes. The infected mosquitoes were collected from the Douglaston and College Point neighborhoods in Queens and Old Town from Staten Island. No human cases have been reported this season. The Health Department will increase mosquito surveillance by setting up additional traps and treating catch basins in the affected areas. The Health Department will continue its efforts to kill mosquito larvae before they can bite by applying larvicide in the city’s catch basins, marshland, and areas with standing water.

“Now that West Nile virus has returned to New York City, it is important to take simple precautions to protect you and your family,” said Health Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett. “During warm weather, mosquitoes can breed in any still water that stands for more than four days, so the most effective way to control mosquitoes is to eliminate standing water. New Yorkers are also encouraged to mosquito-proof their homes, wear mosquito repellent and cover their arms and legs if they’re outside at dawn or dusk. New Yorkers over 50 should be especially cautious, as they are more likely to develop serious illness if they contract the virus.”

Not everyone infected with West Nile virus will become ill. However, West Nile virus can cause serious complications, including neurological diseases, and can also cause a milder flu-like illness with headache, fever and fatigue, weakness and sometimes rash. If you think you have symptoms of West Nile virus, see your doctor right away.

In addition, the Health Department will apply larvicide by helicopter to marsh and other non-residential areas of Staten Island, the Bronx and Queens on Thursday, July 17, Friday, July 18 and Monday, July 21, between the hours of 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. weather permitting. In case of bad weather, application will be delayed untilFriday, July 18, Monday, July 21 and Tuesday, July 22 during the same hours. While three days are allotted for this activity, the application may be completed in less time.

The areas to be treated appear below. These are marshy, natural areas, which are common breeding grounds for mosquitoes. Due to their size and inaccessibility by ground vehicles, these areas will be treated with larvicide from a low-flying helicopter.

VectoBac™ CG, VectoMax™ CG/FG and/or VectoLex™ CG/FG – all containing naturally occurring bacteria – will be used for this application. These larvicides are used throughout the mosquito season to treat mosquito-breeding sites. These products are approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Reducing Exposure to Mosquitoes

  • Use an approved insect repellent containing picaridin, DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus (not for children under three), or products that contain the active ingredient IR3535.
  • Make sure windows have screens and repair or replace screens that have tears or holes.
  • Eliminate any standing water from your property and dispose of containers that can collect water. Standing water is a violation of the New York City Health Code.
  • Make sure roof gutters are clean and draining properly.
  • Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas and hot tubs. Keep them empty or covered if not in use; drain water that collects in pool covers.
  • Report standing water by calling 311 or visiting nyc.gov/health/wnv.

Owling in the Big City


Adventure Awaits in New York State

New York City’s varied habitats and “moveable feast” are why owls, particularly barn owls, great horned owls and eastern screech owls, live and hunt here. Long-eared and northern saw-whet owls are often seen too, the latter especially in winter. Even snowy owls are known to hunt in this metropolis during colder months.

Owls are not an uncommon sight in New York City

Owls are not an uncommon sight in New York City

To see these urban-dwelling raptors, visitors can participate in an organized “owl prowl” (see the NYC Parks website for events) or go on a self-guided search at dusk. A daytime stroll through a wooded area may be rewarded with a glimpse of fledglings closely guarded by their parents. In addition, adult owls may be observed roosting in tree hollows, among thick evergreens and even in nest boxes.

See the Conservationist’s article on owls of New York City for more information.