Tag Archives: E-mail I received

US EPA


The 2013 Toxics Release Inventory preliminary dataset containing the most current TRI data is now available.
You can find out:
  • What toxic chemicals a particular industrial facility is using
  • How much is being released into the environment 
  • Whether the facility is recycling or treating any of the toxic chemical waste, or burning any of it for energy recovery
  • Whether a facility initiated any pollution prevention activities in the most recent calendar year
You can access the data through Envirofacts or downloadable data files on the TRI website. With theEnvirofacts TRI Search, it’s simple – just enter a facility name, location, industry sector, or chemical name.
New to TRI? Why not get familiar with some common TRI terms before you start using the data? Or, you can explore a TRI facility to learn about how and where TRI chemicals are used in one type of industry.
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MARKETING News from the New York Times


City of Yonkers Green Policy Task Force

“All the Green News That’s Fit to Print”

June 15, 2014

The City of Yonkers Green Policy Task Force, established on Earth Day in 2007, is comprised of seven community volunteers, each appointed by a City Council member, and a representative selected by the city administration. Its members compile research on and submit potential legislative initiatives to the City Council; work on environmental quality-of-life improvements for the Yonkers community; apply for and administer environmental grants; define public health issues for the city; and foster educational outreach for Yonkers students and the community-at-large.

GPTF June Meeting: Wednesday, June 18, 6:30 pm
Fourth Floor Conference Room, City Hall.
Agenda: Sustainable Landscapes Report: Molly Roffman
Reuseable Bag Report: Bob Walters
Discussion: Hastings Ordinance re: Plastic Bags and Polystyrene
Brad and Terry: Urban Green Council Walking Tour of Yonkers planning
Any other items that come before the GPTF

Notes From the Plasticene Epoch

from the New York Times Editorial Page, June 15, 2014

From Ocean to Beach, Tons of Plastic Pollution

Like diamonds, plastics are forever. The tons dumped into the ocean float around, swirling on currents, breaking into smaller bits, never going away. Scientists have identified huge gyres of plastic in the Pacific. There is an Eastern Garbage Patch, between Hawaii and California; a Western Garbage Patch, off Japan, and a patch between them called the Subtropical Convergence Zone, north of Hawaii.

The patches are misunderstood to be visible islands of debris; you can’t actually see them from a boat or plane. They are more like vast, soupy concentrations of flotsam, some of it large, some tiny, all indigestible, sickening and killing fish, birds, whales and turtles.

What you can see is what washes ashore, as countless tons of plastic do on the Hawaiian Islands, which stick up like the teeth of a comb in the middle of the northern Pacific, snagging what drifts by.

On the southern tip of the Big Island of Hawaii, deep ocean currents rub against the remote and rocky shoreline. Volunteers regularly make a long, hot trip to clean the beaches, hauling away fishing nets, lines and traps, toys, shoes, buckets and bottles. Some of the fishing debris is shipped to a Honolulu power plant and incinerated. Some is left on the beach, and more always appears.

The Hawaii Wildlife Fund, which organizes the cleanups, estimates that they have removed about 169 tons of garbage in the last 11 years from a 10-mile stretch of Hawaii Island alone, and that about 15 tons to 20 tons of new trash comes ashore each year.

On May 24, two dozen people went out again.

They collected 1,312 pounds of trash, including:

  • 191,739 plastic fragments
  • 562 bottle or container caps
  • 93 toothbrushes
  • 64 beverage bottles
  • 48 hagfish traps
  • 35 buoys and floats
  • 3 refrigerator doors
  • 3 G.I. Joe Real American Hero toys

On a nearby beach at Kamilo Point, geologists have identified a new kind of plastic-infused rock, in areas where the plastic is so abundant in the sand and soil you can’t avoid burning it in campfires.

A paper published this month by the Geological Society of America suggests that “plastiglomerate” will someday be part of the fossil record, marking the geological era that some call the Anthropocene, for the human influence.

On Monday in Washington, the State Department will be holding an ocean conference. The topics are ocean acidification, sustainable fishing and marine pollution. The nations represented include the Seychelles, St. Lucia, Kiribati, Palau, Chile, Togo, Norway and New Zealand. Significant progress on healing the oceans is not expected.

The next cleanup is July 13 at Kamilo Point. The effort may seem futile, but at least people are doing something, like the volunteers working along shorelines in the Northeast, Texas, the Pacific Northwest and the Great Lakes.

World leaders, meanwhile? The nations of an increasingly plasticized planet? They are drifting in circles.

Our Members:
Chairperson: Terry Joshi

City Council President: President Liam McLaughlin with Robert Walters

District 1: Councilmember Christopher Johnson with Clifford Schneider

District 2: Councilmember Corazon Pineda with Nortrud Spero

District 3: Minority Leader Michael Sabatino with Robert Hothan

District 4: Councilmember Dennis Shepherd with Terry Joshi

District 5: Councilmember Mike Breen with Molly Roffman

District 6: Majority Leader John Larkin with Mel Goldstein

Mayor Mike Spano’s Appointee: Brad Tito

 

 


Dolphin Dies in Gowanus


Wall Street journal, January 28th, 2013

FULL TEXT:

A dolphin that swam into an unlikely spot Friday—Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal—later died, authorities said.

As onlookers gaped at the surprising sight, the NYPD Harbor and Emergency Service Units and marine-mammal experts from Long Island’s Riverhead Foundation observed the creature for several hours near Union and Nevins streets.

Officials had planned to wait until high tide at 7:10 p.m. to see if the dolphin could free itself or proceed with a rescue when the tide receded Saturday morning. But the dolphin died early Friday evening, said Julika Wocial, the Riverhead Foundation’s rescue program supervisor. Its body will be removed likely on Saturday, and an examination will be performed by the Foundation to determine the cause of death. The creature appeared to be a common dolphin of adult age and about 6 to 7 feet long, Ms. Wocial said.

It was unclear whether the animal had been sick. But Ms. Wocial said the animal had been exhibiting “concerning behavior.”

“Common dolphins are usually seen in larger groups,” Ms. Wocial said. “This animal is by itself, and it is in the area where we normally wouldn’t see them.”

For much of Friday afternoon, the dolphin remained at the western edge of the canal near Bond Street, as officials weighed the risks of taking action, Ms. Wocial said.

Every few seconds, the creature’s head or dorsal fin would poke through the murky waters, creating ripples and drawing murmurs from onlookers, who stood in the cold with cameras.

Once a major transportation route, the canal was designated a Superfund cleanup site in 2010 by the Environmental Protection Agency, which called it “one of the nation’s most extensively contaminated water bodies.”

Some observers lamented that officials hadn’t rescued the animal and were sad about its death.

“It’s not clean water there,” said Linda Mariano, the 69-year-old co-founder of Friends and Residents of Greater Gowanus, a group that supports the area’s Superfund status. “It’s sad….I don’t know why it wasn’t smart enough to get out of there.”

Another creature found its way to the Gowanus Canal back in 2007, also with an unhappy ending. A 12-foot minke whale—nicknamed “Sludgie” because it appeared to be covered in an oily substance—spent two days swimming near the canal’s mouth then but died before rescuers could coax it to safety.


RIP Steve Jobs






10 years ago the USA had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash ….
Now they have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash


Weather Report



Ladies will understand, men should read and learn


Ladies toilets – so very funny – probably cus it is so true……..

When you have to visit a public toilet, you usually find a line of women, so you smile politely and take your place. Once it’s your turn, you check for feet under the cubicle doors.

Every cubicle is occupied.

Finally, a door opens and you dash in, nearly knocking down the woman leaving the cubicle. You get in to find the door won’t latch. It doesn’t matter, the wait has been so long you are about to wet your pants!

The dispenser for the modern ‘seat covers’ (invented by someone’s Mum, no doubt) is handy, but empty. You would hang your bag on the door hook, if there was one, so you carefully, but quickly drape it around your neck, (Mum would turn over in her grave if you put it on the FLOOR!) down with your pants and assume ‘The Stance.’

In this position, your aging, toneless, thigh muscles begin to shake. You’d love to sit down, but having not taken time to wipe the seat or to lay toilet paper on it, you hold ‘The Stance.’

To take your mind off your trembling thighs, you reach for what you discover to be the empty toilet paper dispenser.

In your mind, you can hear your mother’s voice saying, ‘Dear, if you had tried to clean the seat, you would have KNOWN there was no toilet paper!’ Your thighs shake more.

You remember the tiny tissue that you blew your nose on yesterday – the one that’s still in your bag (the bag around your neck, that now you have to hold up trying not to strangle yourself at the same time). That would have to do, so you crumple it in the puffiest way possible. It’s still smaller than your thumbnail.

Someone pushes your door open because the latch doesn’t work.

The door hits your bag, which is hanging around your neck in front of your chest and you and your bag topple backward against the tank of the toilet.

‘Occupied!’ you scream, as you reach for the door, dropping your precious, tiny, crumpled tissue in a puddle on the floor, while losing your footing altogether and sliding down directly onto the TOILET SEAT. It is wet of course. You bolt up, knowing all too well that it’s too late. Your bare bottom has made contact with every imaginable germ and life form on the uncovered seat because YOU never laid down toilet paper – not that there was any, even if you had taken time to try.

You know that your mother would be utterly appalled if she knew, because you’re certain her bare bottom never touched a public toilet seat because, frankly, dear, ‘You just don’t KNOW what kind of diseases you could get’

By this time, the automatic sensor on the back of the toilet is so confused that it flushes, propelling a stream of water like a fire hose against the inside of the bowl and spraying a fine mist of water that covers your bum and runs down your legs and into your shoes.

The flush somehow sucks everything down with such force and you grab onto the empty toilet paper dispenser for fear of being dragged in too.

At this point, you give up. You’re soaked by the spewing water and the wet toilet seat. You’re exhausted. You try to wipe with a sweet wrapper you found in your pocket and then slink out inconspicuously to the sinks.

You can’t figure out how to operate the taps with the automatic sensors, so you wipe your hands with spit and a dry paper towel and walk past the line of women still waiting

You are no longer able to smile politely to them. A kind soul at the very end of the line points out a piece of toilet paper trailing from your shoe. (Where was that when you NEEDED it?)

You yank the paper from your shoe, plonk it in the woman’s hand and tell her warmly, ‘Here, you just might need this.’

As you exit, you spot your hubby, who has long since entered, used and left the men’s toilet. Annoyed, he asks, ‘What took you so long and why is your bag hanging around your neck?’

This is dedicated to women everywhere who deal with any public toilets. It finally explains to the men what really does take us so long. It also answers that other commonly asked question about why women go to the toilets in pairs. It’s so the other girl can hold the door, hang onto your bag and hand you Kleenex under the door.

This HAD to be written by a woman! No one else could describe it so accurately.

Send this to all women that need a good laugh and to the boys to make them understand that being a girl is not all that easy!

A Friend Is Like A Good Bra…
Hard to Find
Supportive
Comfortable
Always Lifts You Up
Never Lets You Down or Leaves You Hanging
And Is Always Close To Your Heart!!!

Share this with a friend!

I Just Did!